How to Eat Sushi- You've Been Doing it Wrong

Sushi seems like a simple enough thing, but what's the best way to eat it?

With your fingers? Chopsticks? Dipped into soy sauce? 

Daubed with wasabi? One mouthful or two? 

The only certainty, it seems, is that its proper consumption demands both etiquette and practicality.

Many of the best sushi-ya have no menus; the meal is closer to a degustation parade of what's best on the day.


It's not polite to leave a freshly presented piece of sushi for too long in front of you, as temperature, texture and moisture all change.

In this respect the sushi-ya makes more demands of the customer than a typical restaurant -- the diner has a role to play.

Feel free to ask for a repeat of anything you especially liked.

A common faux pas is when a customer fails to inform the master in advance of dislikes or allergies.


That's why when it comes to customers who aren't fluent in Japanese, restaurants like Sawada may ask to speak to your concierge or a Japanese speaker before taking a reservation.

When ordering at a mid-range sushi-ya, your best bet, if you don't speak Japanese, may be to ask for a course within a set budget -- if the restaurant doesn't offer one, write down on a piece of paper what you're prepared to spend per person and simply ask for "o-makase" -- a way of asking the chef to look after you.

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DISCOVER(ディスカバー)

DISCOVERは、世界の「モノ」、「コト」、「場所」、「人」の魅力を再発見する。 また受け継がれている日本の建築、食、祭りなどの多くの伝統文化や風景を、写真とともにわかりやすく解説するメディア。